Food & Drink

We teamed up with our friends at Center Your Health to provide you with 55 tips for eating out! Americans consume 1/3 of their calories away from home!

Nutrition Tips:

1. Before you head out, check out the restaurant’s menu online. This way you are not rushed to make a hasty decision.

2. All-You-Can-Eat places are going to hurt your stomach, body, and your wallet!

3. Make reservations! This will reduce your wait time for when you arrive which will

eliminate hunger time or the window of opportunity for drinks at the bar.

4. Let go of the need to “save your calories.” Sticking with your daily balanced eating routine will help control your appetite.

5. Be the last to sit at the table. Might sound strange, but go to the bathroom and wash your hands. Less time at the table with the bread and butter in-sight will leave a smaller window of opportunity to munch on them.

6. Appetizers don’t have to only come from the first page. Look at the whole menu and find a healthy way to start like a fresh salad or a side item.

7. Beware of fried or breaded foods. They are dangerously unhealthy. 

8. Go easy on condiments, sauces, and dressings.

9. Avocado is healthy for you and high in good quality fat. Enjoy it on salads or in guacamole and as with anything, don’t overdo it.

10. Enjoy salads? Skip the croutons, pasta, creamy dressings, and cheese but add on hard-
boiled eggs, avocado, beans, nuts/seeds, dark leafy greens and an array of crunchy fresh

vegetables.

11. Bulk up your salad with a scoop of quinoa or brown rice, or a palm-sized portion of animal protein.

12. Inquire what the soup of the day is. Bean & pea soups are delicious and packed with fiber and other great nutrients.

13. Keep salad dressings simple. Try a squeeze of lemon or vinegar with a touch of oil. Even a drizzle of maple syrup or truffle oil will bring a whole new life to it!

14. Read labels and question restaurants about their sauces/condiments/dressings. They are the perfect hiding places for MSG and other nasty additives!

15. Pick your side dishes before your entrée. Order as many vegetable options and ask if they could be prepared with butter. It’s a healthier alternative over cheap vegetable or soy oils.

16. Got a need for some crunch? Enjoy fresh crudité rather than chips. Most chips contain harmful oils that are genetically modified.

17. Ask for steamed broccoli and butter on your baked potato rather than getting it loaded with poor quality sour cream and cheese. Even beans and salsa is a great alternative. Eat the skins of the potato, too!

18. Coleslaw when prepared at home can be a refreshing side to your lunch. At restaurants it is usually made with non-organic vegetables and drenched in cheap mayo. Yuck!

19. Find these preparation words: “grilled, baked, steamed, blackened.”

20. Scout out a local farm to table restaurant in your area. This is a perfect way to order almost anything you want on the menu knowing that it’s some of the most nutritious food grown locally and seasonally.

21. Rely more on herbs and spices to flavor your food than sauces or gravies. Herbs are a yummy way to add some health to your meal and spices allow you to enjoy sweet or savory dishes without unhealthy ingredients.

22. Yogurt is a great option on the go for breakfast or as a side at lunch, but most are blended with loads of sugar, defeating their tummy-healthy benefits. Shoot for plain yogurt but add fresh fruit, nuts/seeds and/or honey.

23. Wild, fatty fish like salmon, mackerel and herring are all healthy ways to get in your omega-3s.

24. Have a craving for something salty? Restaurants use poor quality salts that have no nutrients that our bodies need. Order a piece of fish to get in a healthy dose of sea minerals!

25. Eating out is a social event, not a race! Place your fork down in between each bite of food and practice your manners by chewing slowly and completely. This will help you enjoy your food more and eat less.

26. When finished with a meal place your utensils and napkin neatly over the plate so that you won’t continue to eat what’s left over or dip the last few pieces of bread in any extra sauce!

27. Eat slower by putting your fork down in-between bites or eat with your non-dominant hand. For even more of a “slow-down challenge”, eat with chopsticks!

28. Drink a glass of water about 30-minutes before your meal. Often times hunger is a confusion for thirst. Try to avoid drinking anything throughout your meal, but rather chew your food well. This will help aid in digestion. About 15-20 minutes after your meal, it’s fine to drink a glass of water.

29. Start a conversation that will keep you intrigued! You will almost forget you are eating because you will be busy talking, and may eat less.

30. Make your entrée into tomorrow’s lunch. Split it half and bring the other half home.

31. Need something sweet after you eat? Enjoy a fruit bowl, a small scoop of sorbet or even a flavored herbal tea.

32. Share! Those brownies with ice cream on top could be devastating for one person, but a couple extra spoons will limit your portion and will allow all to enjoy.

33. Sharing your food may slow you down and keep you aware of how much you’re

consuming. It’s also a great way to try a few things on the menu!

34. Don’t drink instead of eat. Sure it is okay to enjoy a drink after a long week, but make sure you order your meal before you start to loosen up!

35. Keep your eye on the prize! Talk about your diet. This will leave you responsible for how you eat because you will feel like you can’t preach without practice!

36. Get rid of “I deserve” mentality. You did not just go to a spin class for 2-hours so that you could “deserve” that loaf of bread on the table. You deserve to be healthy, happy and fit…that is an award in and of itself!

37. Ask questions! Don’t feel embarrassed to ask how a food is prepared, if you want something on the side or how big the portion is.

38. Create a rainbow on your plate! Each vibrant color of food from the earth is jam packed with vitamins and nutrients to nourish your body. Order the rainbow!

39. Gravitate towards items: baked, braised, broiled, grilled, poached, roasted, steamed. Menu terms to skip or only enjoy in small quantities are those that contain poor quality fats: batter-fried, pan-fried, buttered, creamed, crispy, breaded.

40. Hunger can drive you to eat too much bread before your meal arrives. Hold the bread or chips until your meal is served. Out of sight, out of mind. Besides, white bread (which most restaurants serve) are just loaded with sugar and empty nutrition.

41. Love breakfast sandwiches, bagels, pancakes or muffins in the morning? Take a step back and recognize that’s a sugar craving. Feed your body high quality protein like eggs, breakfast sausage or plain yogurt over those sugar-filled carbs.

42. Variety abounds when using vegetables as pizza topping. Try broccoli, spinach, green peppers, tomatoes, mushrooms and zucchini. Sometimes you can even skip the cheese and ask for a side of salad dressing on the side for a totally different twist!

43. Turn any omelet into a hearty meal with broccoli, squash, carrots, peppers, tomatoes or onions with some avocado. Skip the cheese but ask for a side of salsa on the side for even more flavor.

44. Egg-white omelets have a reputation for being healthy, but that’s incorrect. Eggs are a perfect, nutritious food and should be enjoyed in their whole form.

45. Looking to trim your tummy? Take a long stroll or walk after your meals to help digestion and burn calories.

46. Jazz up your sushi by asking for more veggies in your roll. Shiitake mushrooms, avocado, pickled or seasonal vegetables are all great ways to add nutrition.

47. Soda, especially diet soda, is linked to a laundry list of health issues. If you love that bubbly, try seltzer water sweetened with a splash of fresh fruit juice and wedge of lemon or orange!

48. Eating just two slices of deli (or other processed) meat a day increases your risk of diabetes/cancer and heart disease by 50 percent. Inquire about the quality of your meat and opt for organic, minimally processed, grass-fed options. Healthy and happy animals make YOU healthy and happy!

49. Lighten up your plate and enjoy a smaller portion of food, but fill up with laughs and good times with the company you are dining with. You’ll be surprised at how fulfilling that is!

50. Is heartburn, bloating or gas a part of your plans after a meal out? It shouldn’t be. Your body is trying to get your attention that something isn’t working. Honestly ask yourself what could be causing these symptoms and experiment with adding or eliminating certain foods that may be triggering it so you can get on with your life!

51. If you enjoyed a bit too much at a meal, don’t guilt yourself. Ask for a cup of hot herbal tea such a peppermint, chamomile or ginger. All will help aid in digestion and fight the occasional nausea.

52. Chinese food isn’t the only place where MSG lingers. Many sauces and dips contain it. Always ask.

53. Eat your plate’s garnish. At the end of your meal don’t forget to enjoy the few sprigs of parsley left on your plate. It’s high in calcium and will freshen your breath!

54. As soon as you have that “I’m almost full” feeling, ask the waiter to pack up your meal.

55. Eating out is a treat. It’s not the end of the world if you splurge a bit; just try not to overdo it.

In almost every “diet” conversation the word “gluten-free” comes up. EVERYONE has their story of a friend or someone they know who “lost 30 pounds” by cutting out gluten. No surprise that this “trendy word” has caught the attention of marketers.  There has been a 43% increase in body care products being labeled and certified as “gluten-free” since 2012.  Even Domino’s Pizza is on the bandwagon with gluten-free pizza crust!Photo Credit: glutenfreeeasily.com

Since nobody in the room wants the acknowledge the elephant. We decided to.

What does “gluten-free” even mean?!

By definition, according to the Mayo Clinic: “The gluten-free diet is a treatment for celiac disease. It is a diet that excludes the protein gluten. Gluten is found in grains such as wheat, barley, rye and triticale (a cross between wheat and rye).”

Did you know that only about 3 million Americans suffer from celiac disease. To put into perspective, that just about 1%. So why is EVERYONE going gluten-free? Well it wasn’t until THIS YEAR, the FDA had to slap a regulation on what exactly “gluten-free” means. So naturally this buzz word was just used in good faith. In reality NOBODY had any clue what it meant…

According to the new regulation, “gluten -free” has some standards. Our favorite being “Must contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten.”

But for the majority of us who are not bothered by gluten, are there real benefits to the diet overhaul? Not really, although some people report feeling better after reducing their intake of products with gluten. But take note: A food billed as “gluten-free” isn’t necessarily healthier. Gluten-free products can be high in calories, fat, and carbohydrates, and some people who go gluten-free actually gain weight.

So will the “gluten-free” diet actually help you with weight-loss? Our opinion is YES, but it is not the removal of gluten doing the work. It is you being conscious of your diet. You have since added in more fruits and vegetables. You have cut out the breads, pasta, cereal, and for some even put down the alcohol.

We are not “against” this new craze, but “Gluten-Free” does not mean rapid weight loss. It means with fewer choices, you’re a lot less likely to overeat!

It is no surprise our fall favorite coffee was offered earlier than ever before!  The pumpkin craze has become significant with back to school and football season. So is this “pumpkin” kick ‘bad’ for your waistline? We certainly know our bank accounts feel it once we realize the $3.00 – $4.00 coffees add up. Add in the occasional donut you buy, and your waistline will grow as your wallet shrinks.Photo Credit: Babble.com

Starbucks’ Pumpkin Spice Latte

Calories: 380
Fat: 13 g
Saturated Fat: 8 g
Cholesterol: 50 mg
Sugars: 49 g
Sodium: 0 mg

Dunkin Donuts Pumpkin Latte With Skim Milk

Calories: 260
Fat: .5 g
Saturated Fat: 0 g
Sugars: 51 g
Sodium: 0 mg
Protein: 12 g
Panera Bread’s Pumpkin Spice Latte
Calories: 340
Fat: 10 g
Saturated Fat: 6 g
Sugars: 46 g
Sodium: 115 mg
Protein: 7 g
As you can see these “Medium” drinks have more sugar than a candy bar! We like to enjoy one occasionally, but that does not mean one a day. That is of course if you plan to look like a pumpkin!

With the return of football, the weekends are often filled with ‘catching the game’ at a friend’s house or a bar. More recently, it is not just the guys screaming at the TV, but the wives and girlfriends have joined in the fun. As you scream at the screen cheering for your team, yelling at the ref, or making last minute fantasy team changes, you are surrounded with temptations. The wings, the pizza, the dips, the Photo Credit: GuysGirl.comchips, the beers. For us college students, saturday is for tailgating and supporting our school. Sunday is for supporting “the team.” How can we still watch the game without throwing in the towel on our diets. Afterall, you can’t out work a bad diet!

Take a look at these Top 8 football-foodTips to Keep the points off the scale.

1) Chicken Tenders over Buffalo Wings. Tenders have a fraction of the fat, calories and sodium compared to wings!

2) Dips. Go for dips that are filled with black beans, fresh vegetables, and salsa as opposed to cheese!

3) Make a Plate. If you are at a house party, make a plate and sit away from the temptations. Portion control on your plate will help eliminate casual picking.

4) Popcorn! A healthy snack to add to the list would be popcorn. Look for low-sodium and avoid “buttery blast”

5) Pre-game. Before the big game, wake up a little earlier than usual. Eat a healthy breakfast and exercise! Don’t use this an excuse to double dip in the treats!

6) Thin Crust! Don’t go ‘deep’ with the crust or add extra cheese. Dab the oil and reach for the thin crust pizza

7) Drive! That’s right…drive! We HOPE you will be responsible and not drink over the limit and drive. Go enjoy a beer or two in the first half than relax because you are responsible!

8) Host! Instead of driving, host the game. You can control which snacks to put out!

There are only a few days left until Memorial Day Weekend. After months and months of hard work at the gym, it is now time to show your body off! Don’t throw away all your hard work while you are out enjoying yourself this weekend. Here are some healthy foods that you should try when you are barbecuing and celebrating the start of summer…

Main Dish: Mozzarella-Stuffed Turkey Burgers

Delicious turkey burgers stuffed with mozzarella and basil served on toasted focaccia with marinara sauce.

Side Dish: Country Potato Salad

An updated version of a potato salad that gets flavor from smoked ham.

Dessert: Strawberry Shortcake

Tender, sweet buttermilk biscuits filled with fresh strawberries and a blend of cream and reduced-fat sour cream.

 

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/strawberry_shortcake.html

Have you ever skipped a meal to “save those calories” for happy hour or drinks later that night? You are not the only one to try and out smart your body. In fact, 20% of students in America suffer from ” Drunkorexia.” Undergraduate females are three times more likely to skip day-time calories and consume them by alcohol instead.

The top three reasons why students suffer from “Drunkorexia:”

  1. Control their Weight
  2. Save Money
  3. Get Drunk Faster

    www.collegecandy.com

    www.collegecandy.com

It does not take a college degree to understand that depriving the body of nutrients and fueling it on alcohol is a recipe for disaster, but skipping a meal for one night of a flat stomach will not only leave you with a hangover the next day, but long-term cognitive problems including difficulty concentrating, studying and making decisions.

A helpful page for those who do consume alcohol, but want to be conscious of their calorie intake should visit Drinkaware

Please remember that the fruit in the jungle juice does not count as your daily fruit serving!

For more information: huffingtonpost

alcohol blog Drinking alcohol and staying healthy often do not go hand in hand. Alcohol, like soda, is just empty calories that add no nutritional value to your body. The argument for drinking alcohol is that we don’t drink it for the nutritional value. Very often when college aged participate in drinking liquor it is done it what is known as “binge” behavior. We drink excessive amounts on the weekends and often none during the week. This binge behavior can have immense effects on our body and in fact cause us to gain access weight.

The average alcoholic beverage contains carbs, sugar and ethanol. When the beverage is consumed it goes to the stomach where some of the alcohol is absorbed through the stomach lining into the bloodstream, the carbs and sugar get digested through the traditional digestive tract and then the ethanol is diverted to the liver. The way your body treats the alcohol leads to a disruption in the body’s processing of food. Ethanol, which has no nutritional value, gets burned off first. Then any calories remaining in your stomach, either from the alcohol or the food you ate with the drink, gets stored as fat. Often times the food choices we make while drinking are usually unhealthy. While things like protein and carbs require some body energy to be processed, fat requires none and is then directly deposited. With all this information out there, we still ignore the warning signs of alcohol and how bad it can be for our body, and consume it anyway. Realistically college kids aren’t going to be stop drinking anytime soon. The remedy in this case may not be to give up drinking entirely, just how we do it.

When our bodies consume alcohol we recognize it as a toxin and struggle to metabolize it. Our bodies cannot adapt to metabolizing alcohol when it is only done excessively and occasionally. In that case our body quickly turns it into fat and stores it. Although, when we drink in moderation more often our bodies can learn to handle to processing of alcohol in a more efficient matter. In people who drink eight ounces of alcohol daily do not store the calories consumed while drinking as fat. As an overall lifestyle, those who drink moderately over time learn to make concessions in their diet when they expect they will be drinking.

Another obstacle we face while drinking is that often bar tenders will serve us more than the suggested amount. As well, if we are serving ourselves we have a tough time measuring the amount we should be drinking. In both scenarios we end up over pouring and drinking too much.   To help control the over pouring, a good option is to order a bottle of light beer. This is already portion controlled for us and therefore we are not left to our own devices.

In reality, college student are not going to stop drinking. Although, it is realistic to think that we have the power to change our drinking habits and how they eventually correlate with our eating habits. By making smarter, lighter more moderate decisions when it comes to alcohol, we will see the effects of those choices throughout our life.

 

From Women’s Health Magazine

photo credit: www.self.com

photo credit: www.self.com

Why does it seem that you only crave foods that are bad for you? Whether it’s chocolate, salty potato chips, or sweet candy, when that craving hits- you just have to satisfy it. Instead of reaching for your usual treat, packed with calories and regret, learn the secret to being satisfied and still healthy.

Craving candy? Try fruit. Forget that it’s healthy- and you’ll be surprised how sweet and satisfying it can be. There are plenty of fruits that have that sweet taste without all the extra, unwanted calories. In addition to curbing that sweet tooth craving, try adding higher fiber foods and whole grains.

Chocolate always seems to be the first thing we tend to gravitate towards to make ourselves feel good. It’s my number one go- to craving, and it’s almost impossible to fight. The good news- you don’t have to eliminate chocolate all together when that hankering hits. To satisfy that craving, choose dark chocolate. Chocolate with 75 percent cacao or higher is lower in sugar and higher in antioxidants. Chocolate is chocolate- why not make it good for you.

The craving for salty foods, such as potato chips or popcorn, is often linked with chronic stress affecting your adrenal glands. It is important to keep your stress under control. Some ways to get a handle on stress are meditation and breathing exercises. If you take a moment to meditate and breathe before reaching for that salty morsel, you will cut your binging in half.

The ultimate craving cure, and perhaps the easiest addition to anyone’s daily diet, is drinking water! Yes, water! Most of the time when we interpret our bodies signals as food cravings, we are actually just dehydrated. Research suggests that 80 percent of people are chronically dehydrated. Before reaching for that piece of food, try drinking a tall glass of water first. Wait 30 minutes after you finished your glass of water, and then decide then if you are still hungry. I’ve tried this… and it works!

It is important to distinguish between your body’s needs and wants. Of course everyone is going to indulge once in a while, and that’s okay. Making unhealthy snacks a habit is not okay. Try and be conscious of your decisions and think about what it is that your body is really asking for, and consider all ways to satisfy that need in the healthiest way.

 

From: Women’s Health Magazine

It’s great to be healthy, but healthy doesn’t always mean denying ourselves a reward.

After long hours of work, what better way to celebrate than by enjoying a cocktail?  Make it a skinny version! Here are a few recipes for cocktails under 150 calories:

photo credit: losangeles.cbslocal.com

photo credit: losangeles.cbslocal.com

I love a Cosmopolitan just as much as the next girl, but is it really, worth 220 calories per drink?  Make it worth your while by taking it down a notch.  Here’s how to enjoy 75 calories worth of a Cosmo!

  • Squeeze a wedge of lime and a wedge of orange into 1 oz. of cranberry flavored vodka
  • Fill the glass with club soda and serve over ice

Looking for something simple, delicious, and NOT fattening?  Check this out. Only 75 calories!

  • Pick a flavored vodka or rum
  • Add club soda, a twist of lime, and pour it on the rocks!

Mimosas without the feeling of regret afterwards:

  • 1 oz. orange juice and 3 oz. champagne

Margarita Monday just got even better. Enjoy a mini margarita for only 80 calories.

  • Squeeze a couple of lime and orange wedges into a glass.
  • Add 1 oz of tequila and a splash of sweet and sour mix (optional).
  • Blend with ice cubes or serve on the rocks, your choice!

Mhm, Bellini? Don’t mind if I do! Enjoy a Basic Bellini for only 105 calories:

  • Blend 2 oz white-peach puree with 4 oz Prosecco

Feeling guilty about your love for daiquiris? Not anymore! 135 calories of deliciousness by following this recipe:

  • Puree 1 cup of strawberries in a blender with 1 oz. light rum and a handful of ice cubes and a sprinkle of sugar

Pina Coladas are the perfect summer drink! Unfortunately they are 700 calories! Not worth it. How about enjoying a refreshing Nada Colada?

  • Mix 1 oz. coconut rum with 4 oz pineapple juice
  • Top with a splash of club soda
  • Serve over ice

Enjoy and reward yourself, while still living a healthy lifestyle, sans the extra calories.

Recipes taken from: http://www.dailyspark.com/blog.asp?post=10_cocktails_with_150_calories_or_less

As college students, time management is crucial. We need more hours to study, to get to the gym to make time for our friends, and in many cases- time to eat. When time is limited, many college students choose to drop by the drive-thru instead of stopping by the salad bar. We’ve all done it. It’s easy, and you get more for your money, right?

We have to keep in mind, as with anything in life, the “easy” choices come with consequences.

photo credit: wisefoodstorage.com

photo credit: wisefoodstorage.com

Federal Health Officials claim that 11 percent of Americans caloric intake is contributed to the fast food industry. In 2006, it was reported to be at 13 percent according to the U.S Center for Disease Controls and Prevention. As a country, we are making healthier choices slightly more often but it still is not enough.The studied compared age groups, and noted that the older participants were, the less the ate fast food. Clearly, college students are at a higher risk than most adults. Late night drinking leads to late night drive-thru’s. Here are some things to consider before stopping for fast food:

Your body will feel lethargic after the meal, you won’t get some of the essential nutrients you need, and your body will be working overtime to digest and store the excess fat, carbohydrates, and sugar.

A cheat meal once in awhile is okay, but don’t make fast food a habit. The damage done to your body over the long term isn’t worth is. Next time, make a smarter opinion. Your workout and body will thank you later.

 

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2013/02/21/fast-food-makes-up-11-percent-of-calories-in-us-diet-cdc